Ohhh, Fatty

I won't sit here and whine about how "I've been fat since I was born." It's lame, repetitive, and you really don't care. I will tell you that my mind is set. I am going to take off this fat suit.
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Asker Anonymous Asks:
Do you have like a beginners guide to being vegan by any chance? I would like to try but it seems a bit difficult to stick to
ohhfattygirl ohhfattygirl Said:

funeralformyfat:

The book Skinny Bitch helped me! It provided me lots of helpful tips and reasons to go vegan in a sassy and fun way! It might be helpful!

Breakfast this morning before hiking.

Trader Joe’s Sprouted bread
Avocado
Boiled Egg
Salt and Pepper to taste

rachelakelso:

mollybroxton said: What on earth is your setup for the pov ones? xoxo

A tripod fully extended, on top of various tables! I shot all these with the 18-55mm IS Canon kit lens, so I could crop a good 16:9 area without the tripod legs in the frame. 

rockys-cock:

This picture was too good for me not to share. 

This is Chris Dobens, creator of the Boston Strong T shirt campaign, embracing his girlfriend,Emily Engelhardt, who was injured in last year’s marathon bombing, right before she crosses the finish line. 

This picture is, in my opinion, one of the most important ones taken today. 

(via emily-pluspoints)

mrsjonie:

Skillet Collards with Mushrooms & Eggs. Ingredients: 

  • Olive oil or coconut oil
  • Your choice of mushrooms – cut into thin slices (I used baby bella)
  • 2 cloves garlic – minced
  • One large bunch of collard greens – hard stems removed, and cut into 1-inch ribbons
  • 4 eggs
  • Season with salt and pepper and chili pepper flakes.
  • Additional toppings (optional):
  • Feta cheese, goat cheese or shaved parmesan cheese

Method:  Heat a 10 or 12 inch cast iron skillet over medium-high fire. Swirl in some oil to coat the skillet well. Add in mushrooms, and cook for a minute or until the mushrooms are almost tender. Stir in garlic, and cook until fragrant. Then add in the collard greens, and cook until the green begins to wilt (stir greens while cooking). Make four wells in between the greens. Crack an egg into each well. Lower the heat, cover, and let cook undisturbed for 4-5 minutes. When the eggs are cooked to your liking, remove from heat, season lightly with Sweet Ginger Sea Salt, and sprinkle generously with Aleppo Chili Pepper Flakes or Marash Chili Flakes. Top with cheese and serve.

(via fithappypixie)

fithappypixie:

A breakfast from last week: two eggs on crisp bread and a dairyfree smoothie with banana, berries, grapes and water.

thehealthycook:

1. Find your roots. In standing poses that means pressing your feet into the floor for stability. In seated poses, it’s your sitting bones that will ground. In Downward Dog, your hands and your feet become your roots. A strong foundation almost always makes for a stronger and safer pose.
2. Elongate your spine. This is the one instruction I hear more than any other in my yoga classes–and with good reason! When I learned to find as much length as possible in my spine my poses felt light, more buoyant, and a lot safer, too.
3. Pull the ribcage back in line and lengthen the tailbone. My tendency in most poses is to stick my butt out and my ribcage forward, creating a super-arch in my low back. It also creates a pesky dull ache. This is not the kind of backbend that will help you gain strength and stability. So, I’m always asking checking in to make sure my tailbone is lengthening (i.e. my butt is not sticking out) and my rib cage is in line.
4. Firm your thigh muscles. I’m a hyper-extender. This means my joints are a little TOO flexible–particularly my knees. When I baring weight on my legs, as in standing poses like Trikonasana, I have to be careful not to put my knees in a compromising position. So I have to be sure that my thigh muscles are firm and working to protect my knees.
5. Relax. No matter what pose I’m practicing, I try to find my edge. Then I take a deep breath and back off just a little. This way I’m working …but it’s not a struggle. I can hold poses for longer this way, and I’m less prone to injury. source(x)

thehealthycook:

1. Find your roots. In standing poses that means pressing your feet into the floor for stability. In seated poses, it’s your sitting bones that will ground. In Downward Dog, your hands and your feet become your roots. A strong foundation almost always makes for a stronger and safer pose.

2. Elongate your spine. This is the one instruction I hear more than any other in my yoga classes–and with good reason! When I learned to find as much length as possible in my spine my poses felt light, more buoyant, and a lot safer, too.

3. Pull the ribcage back in line and lengthen the tailbone. My tendency in most poses is to stick my butt out and my ribcage forward, creating a super-arch in my low back. It also creates a pesky dull ache. This is not the kind of backbend that will help you gain strength and stability. So, I’m always asking checking in to make sure my tailbone is lengthening (i.e. my butt is not sticking out) and my rib cage is in line.

4. Firm your thigh muscles. I’m a hyper-extender. This means my joints are a little TOO flexible–particularly my knees. When I baring weight on my legs, as in standing poses like Trikonasana, I have to be careful not to put my knees in a compromising position. So I have to be sure that my thigh muscles are firm and working to protect my knees.

5. Relax. No matter what pose I’m practicing, I try to find my edge. Then I take a deep breath and back off just a little. This way I’m working …but it’s not a struggle. I can hold poses for longer this way, and I’m less prone to injury. source(x)

(via emily-pluspoints)

demira11:

Grapefruit, orange, lemon, carrot juice to Cleans the body in the morning 👌👌👌 #801010 #govegan #rawvegan #juicing

(via healthiestvibes)